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Why you need to protect your hair from heat

Flat irons, curling tongs and blow dryers, where would we be without them? They bring style to our locks and confidence to our hair days, but as much as we love their results they’re also hard on our hair.  This is where heat protectants and some simple guidelines are worth their weight in gold.

Your hair, like your skin suffers from heat damage. Just like your skin, your hair needs to be protected before it’s exposed. Hair that is unprotected and overstressed by heat ends up suffering from split ends, breakage and dullness and I bet none of these are on your hair wish list. So let’s talk prevention.

heat protectant pic.jpg

What to look for in a heated appliance:

  • Heated appliances are an investment. While cheap heated appliances appeal to the pocket the flip side is they are also more likely to damage your hair. Quality professional appliances will last longer and are less likely to fry your hair.
  • Looking for appliances that have temperature control is important. Fine hair requires lower temperatures while thicker hair needs higher temperatures.
  • Tools with ceramic or tourmaline plates are ideal as they heat up quickly and evenly.
  • Ask your stylist for some advice on which are the best styling appliances for your hair and for tips on using your heated appliances at home.
  • Click here to read an excellent rundown on flat irons from Hair Straightener Studio.

How heat protectants work:

  • Provides a layer of moisture that forms a barrier against damage – reducing moisture loss.
  • They allow the heat to be distributed more evenly.
  • They slow down the heating process so you’re not cooking your hair.
  • Keep in mind – they protect but they are unable to prevent long term damage if you’re using irons daily at high temperatures.

How to use a heat protectant:

  • Applying to wet hair helps to distribute the products more evenly, whether you’re applying a spray, crème or oil. After applying, use a wide-toothed comb to gently comb through your hair.
  • If using a spray, hold it away from your hair to allow it to disperse as effectively as possible.
  • If using a leave-in crème or riot control oil work through the lengths and ends of your hair.

Musts for using heated appliances:

  • Your hair must be dry before you using flat irons or curling tongs – if you skip this step you will cause serious damage to your hair by boiling the moisture out of it.
  • Heat can damage hair structure, so applying heat protection before applying heat is a must.
  • If you are a daily heated appliance user, consider giving your hair some time off for good behaviour. Long-term use of heated appliances does come with consequences.
  • Schedule conditioning treatments in. Help replenish the moisture you lose with heated appliances by making time to inject moisture back into it with a deep intense conditioning masque – add a good book or movie and your favourite drink and call it a wellness retreat.
  • If your hair has suffered from heated appliances for a long time, consider treating it to an in-salon rescue therapy. This will help repair and restore proteins and moisture to your long-suffering locks and protect them from future damage.
  • Don’t use flat irons and curling tongs every day if you want your hair to be in peak condition.
  • No one should use heat at 200+ degrees Celcius / 390+ degrees Fahrenheit on their hair.
  • If your appliances are hot enough to sizzle or smoke when touching your hair, they’re doing damage.
  • Always keep your heated tools on the move to avoid damage.

 

your hair, your rules, your life

Neil Cleminson

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Tips & Tricks

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